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Hi Branson, in some audio form somewhere on the internet you shared your philosophy of how you DM. It followed along the lines of doing the maximum amount of preparation, and being okay to go with the flow during the session. You phrased it perfectly and I was wondering if you remember what you said?

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No recollection of where I would’ve said that but it sounds like I was describing “maximum preparation, total flexibility” which is something I picked up at Story Pirates back when I was directing with them. The distinction between the words “maximum” and “total” is the key. The idea being that you prepare as much as you can but inevitably something unexpected will come up and you should always bend to the unexpected rather than trying to force it into a hole shaped like your plans. If you’ve prepared enough you should be able to roll with the changes more confidently. It’s a great philosophy for this kind of stuff even though irl I tend to slack on preparation because I’ve become so confident in my ability to roll with stuff. Still, it’s nice when you’re rolling with things and you can stumble organically onto something you did prepare.

I applied it to DMing because I’m sure that’s what we were talking about wherever I said that but it applies to almost all creative work. It might even apply out further than that. I assume it does but I wouldn’t know. I wasn’t built for the white collar world.

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deebee
6 days ago
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"maximum preparation, total flexibility"
also this freak used to work on Story Pirates?
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The Master

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I guess it’s unrealistic in 2022 for an otherwise good night not to have some sadness mixed in:

Vin Scully, the voice of the Dodgers for more than six decades, whose folksy manner and melodic language made him a beloved figure in American culture, died Tuesday, the team announced.

A household name in Southern California, where he held a running conversation with baseball fans each season, He was 94.

His career with the Dodgers, which dated back to 1950 when the team was still in Brooklyn, took off with the move to Los Angeles before the 1958 season. Wooing a new fan base, he was on his way to becoming one of sports’ greatest broadcasters, blessed with a knack for storytelling and, as veteran commentator Bob Costas put it, “the sheer sound of his voice.”

In an interview in 2016, his final season, Scully described his approach to the job simply: “I guess it’s kind of a running commentary with an imaginary friend.”

Among his most famous broadcasts was the 1965 perfect game by Sandy Koufax. With the Dodgers playing the Chicago Cubs, Koufax headed to the mound for the ninth inning needing three more outs. Scully told listeners it was “the toughest walk of his career, I’m sure.”

This was legendary status that was fully earned. Hearing him call a game, alone, was pure pleasure. In his last years if I felt like having a game on and nobody I had a rooting interest in was playing, it was always the Dodgers I put on. R.I.P.

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deebee
7 days ago
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Scully was a master at playing silent and letting the viewer hear the natural sound of the game. I'd wager no one has has ever held quiet for ~2 minutes in a situation like that and no one ever will again.
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fxer
7 days ago
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Relive ‘86 https://youtu.be/7ujwjqIldwU
Bend, Oregon

Get Your First Look at Dan Harmon’s Latest Creation, “Krapopolis”

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Community, Rick and Morty, and Harmontown are all proud hallmarks for Dan Harmon that will likely stand the test of a very long time. So, naturally, whatever he’s on to next will be so highly anticipated that there’s probably not even a fully accurate metric for it. Krapopolis, his latest series that will premiere on Fox next year, is no exception even though it feels like we’ve heard about it being in the works for years now. Krapopolis will follow […]
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deebee
15 days ago
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I'm sure it gets funnier
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Death traps

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This is a grimly fascinating look at the deadliest stretch of roadway in America (three guesses which state it’s in and the first two don’t count.) Needless to say, it’s also reflective of deep-seated national problems:

Robert Schneider, a professor of urban planning at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, has never driven on this part of US-19. But amid a rise in pedestrian deaths across the country, Schneider and three of his colleagues — Rebecca Sanders, Frank Proulx, and Hamideh Moayyed — decided to look at the data on pedestrian deaths to try to find out where they were happening most frequently. Using information from the government’s database of fatal car crashes, the Fatality Analysis Reporting System, Schneider and his colleagues looked at all the pedestrian deaths recorded between 2001 and 2016. The idea was to identify hot spots: 1,000-meter segments of roadway where six or more pedestrians were killed over two eight-year periods. “We thought: What can we find out about the places where these fatalities happened?” Schneider says. There would likely be similarities, he assumed, which could point to potential safety improvements. “One thing we wanted to shed light on is that they truly aren’t random.”

They were expecting to find some overlap. But one road came up so many times that the results, Schneider says, were “eye-popping.” Out of the 60 hot spots they identified as having a high number of deaths, seven of them were on US-19 in Pasco County alone — more than any other road in the United States. “When you add the numbers up, that’s 137 pedestrian fatalities over the entire Pasco County. That’s an incredibly high number,” Schneider says. “If an airplane crashed there and 137 people died, people would know about it,” he says.

The study looked at deaths through 2016 — the most recent year finalized data was available. But a Vox analysis of open-source data from the Florida Department of Transportation showed that pedestrian fatalities have continued to be a problem: 48 people have been killed in car crashes that involved pedestrians on US-19 in Pasco County between 2017 and June 2022.

[…]

If accidents are supposed to be random, Singer says, “then accidental death would be evenly distributed across the country — but it’s not.” Schneider’s study showed that pedestrian deaths aren’t random, either. The places with the most pedestrian deaths tend to look like US-19 in one way or another: high-speed, with multiple lanes, and lots of commercial and residential development around them. Three-quarters of them are bordered by low-income areas, where people may be less likely to have access to a car. They are in places as diverse as Langley Park, Maryland; Albuquerque, New Mexico; Manhattan, New York; and Los Angeles, California. They’re places where pedestrians are forced to cross roads that are dangerous by design, alongside trucks and SUVs that are getting bigger and deadlier all the time.

One of the more distinctive aspects of American culture is the sheer amount of avoidable accidental death a majority of people can learn to live with or ignore.

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deebee
15 days ago
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The entire state of Florida is a scam
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Your Kids Have Been Totally Off Screens and Playing Outside for the Entire Fifteen Minutes Before You Arrived to Pick Them Up

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Oh, look who’s here! And so soon too. We’ve been having a blast. See how your kids are playing outside with my kids, who are also outside? Trampoline, tetherball, chaos tag—they’re going to sleep well tonight. A second ago, we were having a competition to see who could yell out the most classics of American literature while in the air. And that craft project over there, with the clay—we didn’t make a lot of headway, but I’d love to have those blobs fired in a kiln. Do you have a kiln at your house? I’m thinking of getting a kiln.

I hope you can gather from my breathing that I have been personally engaged in physical activity with your kids. We were about to head to the park when you pulled up, but I suppose they can hike and press leaves into the pages of their journals another time. And I’ve started lanyards for them—here, I’ve done the hardest part; now it’s just a matter of weaving the top strand under the loop that the bottom strand just went over. You’ll be done in no time.

No, don’t thank me—thank yourself. Thank yourself and your parenting and your genetics. Your kids have been such a joy, so thoughtful and polite, or I believe they would have been, had I engaged with them in any way, before fifteen minutes ago, when you texted you were coming over and I killed the Wi-Fi and forced them out of the house.

The rest of the time, I have no idea what the fuck they were doing. I was out working on the deck, and they were inside with nineteen iPads, two TVs, and an Xbox.

But fifteen minutes ago, they dropped their devices and staggered like escaped convicts into the sun. And look at them now—these are the moments they’ll remember. Seriously, most kids have a memory like my aunt Mary. If you cram those last fifteen minutes with activities, they’ll forget they spent most of the day on the couch, staring into the void. That way, when you ask them in the car about their playdate, you’ll think I’ve been running a goddamn Camp Kikiwaka over here.

I’m sure I will have a similarly compressed sense of the afternoon, though my memory is muddled by a couple of bourbons and a Candy Crush marathon. That’s what I meant by “working on the deck.”

One thing you should know: I had to bribe the kids with ice cream to keep them from killing each other, even for fifteen minutes. I know it’s dinner time, but I believe in delivering on my promises, so if you could swing by Baskin-Robbins on your way home, because those store-bought tubs won’t do once you’ve committed to a waffle cone.

Come to think of it, until the last quarter hour, they haven’t been much interested in “food” at all. There was one awkward exchange with the older boy while his iPad was updating. He followed me around the kitchen, saying, “Can I have a bite of that?” I think it was the older boy; I had sunglasses on. Whoever it was, I threw him a bag of Goldfish, and he went away.

Anyway, thanks again for suggesting a playdate and then suggesting my house as the location. The only thing I like better than playing with my children is playing with other people’s children, so I don’t mind sacrificing a portion of my Saturday to the task. And don’t feel like you now have to reciprocate by having my kids over and entertaining them, outside, without screens. It’s just something I genuinely enjoy doing, for about fifteen minutes, toward the end of our kids’ time together.

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deebee
16 days ago
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Read too fast and you'll catch a truth burn from this one
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First-In-Class.

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Merritt Sellers, 14 (above), drove the 36-foot J/111 sailboat "nosurprise" to a first-in-class finish in 98th running of the Bayview to Mackinac race ...

A 14-year-old girl sailing her first Bayview Mackinac Race with her father won the race Sunday night after 33 hours of non-stop work.

As the duo pulled into the Mackinac Island harbor just after 9 p.m., a crowd at the Pink Pony restaurant and bar cheered, whistled and applauded. 

The island had been buzzing all day, wondering if young Merritt Sellers could pull it off.

"Congratulations! I'm very impressed. So's the world," yelled Janet Bradley, 63, a real estate agent from Sarnia, Ontario, Canada, who has raced to Mackinac six times. 

The competition began for the J/111 sailboat "nosurprise" at 11:30 a.m. Saturday just north of the Blue Water Bridge in Port Huron for Merritt and Scott Sellers of Larkspur, California.

The whole endeavor seemed ambitious and almost unbelievable.

Merritt Sellers needed to sail the boat at night alone on the 204-nautical-mile journey (235 land miles) while her father rested below deck.

"I sat there, trimming the sail, eating Sun Chips, and thinking about how much I wanted to go to bed," Merritt said afterward.

A sailboat that typically raced with eight sailors had only two aboard.

Not only did they win, but they crossed the finish line more than an hour before their nemesis, a boat named "Utah" from Holland, Michigan, that carried seasoned sailors who had won repeatedly in the past. 

CONNECT 

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deebee
23 days ago
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